Family Long-tailed Tits (Aegithalidae)

Least Concern

Burmese Tit (Aegithalos sharpei)

Following the taxonomy applied to HBW Alive, derived from the HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World, this taxon is now lumped within Black-browed Tit (Aegithalos bonvaloti).

Taxonomy

French: Mésange de Sharpe German: Burmaschwanzmeise Spanish: Mito Birmano
Other common names: Myanmar Tit
Taxonomy:

Aegithaliscus sharpei

Rippon

, 1904,

Mount Victoria, southern Chin Hills, Myanmar

.

Forms a superspecies with A. niveogularis, A. iouschistos and A. bonvaloti; all four sometimes treated as conspecific, but they seem to be morphologically fairly distinct from one another and, while ranges overlap only minimally or not at all, there is no evidence of intergradation or hybridization between any of them. Present species usually treated as conspecific with A. bonvaloti (sometimes with both A. bonvaloti and A. iouschistos when these are combined), but distinctive appearance (closer to that of A. niveogularis) and geographically remote distribution justify its treatment as a distinct species. Monotypic.

Distribution:

Mt Victoria and Mindat, in S Chin Hills of SW Myanmar.

Descriptive notes

11 cm. A typical long-tailed tit in size and shape, with well-graduated tail. Forehead and centre of crown are whitish, grading to cinnamon-brown on rear crown and nape; side... read more

Voice

Calls include thin, high-pitched "tsi-si-si-si", more rolling "tseep", soft... read more

Habitat

More or less open forest of pines (Pinus) at 2500–3000 m (pine forest occupies drier... read more

Food and feeding

No information. Behaviour reminiscent of that of A. caudatus.

Breeding

Adult carrying nest material on 3rd Apr, mating on 13th Apr and fledged young seen in May; male with enlarged testes in mid-Apr and two... read more

Movements

Resident, with some seasonal altitudinal movement.

Status and conservation

Not assessed. Poorly known; apparently not common, as some recent visitors to Mt Victoria have had difficulty in finding this species. Forest on Mt Victoria has been almost... read more

Recommended citation

Harrap, S. (2017). Burmese Tit (Aegithalos sharpei). In: del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. (retrieved from https://www.hbw.com/node/59748 on 19 November 2017).