Family Manakins (Pipridae)

Least Concern

Golden-collared Manakin (Manacus vitellinus)

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Taxonomy

French: Manakin à col d’or German: Goldbandpipra Spanish: Saltarín cuellidorado
Taxonomy:

Pipra vitellina

Gould

, 1843,

Panama City, Panama

.

Phylogenetic study#R supports sister relationship between present species and W races of M. manacus. See also M. candei; differs from that species and from M. aurantiacus in characters given under those species. Differs from M. manacus in its (in males) yellow vs white (or very pale yellow in M. m. flaveolus) chin to breast, head sides and mantle (3); olive-green vs dirty white lower breast to vent (3); olive-green vs grey rump and uppertail-coverts (3); and (females) slightly brighter olive-green underparts with slightly yellower belly (ns[1]); plus narrow hybrid zone in Colombia (lower Cauca Valley, also SW Cauca) (2). Four subspecies recognized.

What do the figures in brackets mean? Learn more about the scoring system.
Subspecies and Distribution
  • M. v. vitellinus (Gould, 1843) – Panama (E from Bocas del Toro on Caribbean slope and E from Veraguas on Pacific slope) and NW Colombia (N Chocó, and N Antioquia around Gulf of Urabá).
  • M. v. amitinus Wetmore, 1959 – Escudo de Veraguas I, off N Panama (Bocas del Toro).
  • M. v. milleri Chapman, 1915 – N Colombia in valleys of Sinú and lower Cauca (Córdoba, Antioquia, Bolívar).
  • M. v. viridiventris Griscom, 1929 – W Colombia W of W Andes (S to SW Cauca), also on E side in upper Cauca Valley.
  • Descriptive notes

    10–11 cm; male 19·3 g, female 17·1 g. Male nominate race has black cap, golden-yellow on rest of head, upper mantle, shoulders, and chin to breast, throat feathers elongated (projected forwards well beyond bill tip in display); black back, wings and tail, olive lower back; four outermost primaries very narrow and stiff, secondaries with unusually thick shafts and stiff outer webs; lower underparts pale olive; iris dark brown; bill blackish; legs reddish-orange. Female has dull olive head and upperparts, paler and more olive-yellow below. Juvenile resembles female. Races differ mainly in size and in intensity of male coloration: amitinus is noticeably larger than others; milleri resembles nominate; viridiventris has brighter lemon-yellow throat.

    ssp vitellinus  

    Drawing by Jan Wilczur
    ssp vitellinus  
    Descriptive notes:

    10–11 cm; male 19·3 g, female 17·1 g. Male nominate race has black cap, golden-yellow on rest of head, upper mantle, shoulders, and chin to breast, throat feathers elongated (projected forwards well beyond bill tip in display); black back, wings and tail, olive lower back; four outermost primaries very narrow and stiff, secondaries with unusually thick shafts and stiff outer webs; lower underparts pale olive; iris dark brown; bill blackish; legs reddish-orange. Female has dull olive head and upperparts, paler and more olive-yellow below. Juvenile resembles female. Races differ mainly in size and in intensity of male coloration: amitinus is noticeably larger than others; milleri resembles nominate; viridiventris has brighter lemon-yellow throat.

    Drawing by Jan Wilczur
    ssp vitellinus  
    Descriptive notes:

    10–11 cm; male 19·3 g, female 17·1 g. Male nominate race has black cap, golden-yellow on rest of head, upper mantle, shoulders, and chin to breast, throat feathers elongated (projected forwards well beyond bill tip in display); black back, wings and tail, olive lower back; four outermost primaries very narrow and stiff, secondaries with unusually thick shafts and stiff outer webs; lower underparts pale olive; iris dark brown; bill blackish; legs reddish-orange. Female has dull olive head and upperparts, paler and more olive-yellow below. Juvenile resembles female. Races differ mainly in size and in intensity of male coloration: amitinus is noticeably larger than others; milleri resembles nominate; viridiventris has brighter lemon-yellow throat.

    ssp viridiventris  

    Drawing by Jan Wilczur
    ssp viridiventris  
    Descriptive notes:

    10–11 cm; male 19·3 g, female 17·1 g. Male nominate race has black cap, golden-yellow on rest of head, upper mantle, shoulders, and chin to breast, throat feathers elongated (projected forwards well beyond bill tip in display); black back, wings and tail, olive lower back; four outermost primaries very narrow and stiff, secondaries with unusually thick shafts and stiff outer webs; lower underparts pale olive; iris dark brown; bill blackish; legs reddish-orange. Female has dull olive head and upperparts, paler and more olive-yellow below. Juvenile resembles female. Races differ mainly in size and in intensity of male coloration: amitinus is noticeably larger than others; milleri resembles nominate; viridiventris has brighter lemon-yellow throat.

    Voice

    Male calls at lek a slightly trilled “peerr” and a clear “chee-pooh”; also loud wing-snaps during display.

    Habitat

    Forest borders and secondary woodland, also dense regenerating clearings; lowlands and foothills, to 450 m in Panama, to 1200 m in Colombia.

    Food and feeding

    Small fruits and insects, plucked or snatched in short aerial sallies.

    Breeding

    Egg-laying in Feb–Aug in Panama; in Colombia Feb–May in N (Chocó, N Antioquia), probably Jul in S (Valle). Male displays with others at lek, each clearing a small “court” in which several vertical stems present, displays mainly by jumping between stems with “about-face” on landing, also occasional crouching with head retracted, body swaying and wings beating, and with throat feathers projected forwards; when female visits, both sexes perform co-ordinated to-and-fro jumps between mating stem and an adjacent one, crossing in mid-air, female finally landing on mating perch, male then jumping to ground, leaping back up to mating stem and sliding down it. Nest a thinly woven shallow cup of rootlets and fungal hyphae, lined with finer material, slung between horizontal supports, and secured with cobweb, 0·6–1·5 m above ground. Clutch 2 eggs; incubation period not documented; fledging period 13–15 days.

    Movements

    Apparently sedentary.

    Status and conservation

    Not globally threatened. The most abundant manakin over much of its range. Common in most of Panama, including both sides of Canal area; very common to common throughout Colombian range.

    Recommended citation

    Snow, D. (2018). Golden-collared Manakin (Manacus vitellinus). In: del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. (retrieved from https://www.hbw.com/node/57092 on 10 December 2018).