Family Tits and Chickadees (Paridae)

Least Concern

Oak Titmouse (Baeolophus inornatus)


Taxonomy

French: Mésange unicolore German: Eichenmeise Spanish: Herrerillo unicolor
Taxonomy:

Parus inornatus

Gambel

, 1845,

near Monterey, California, USA

.

Until recently treated as conspecific with B. ridgwayi (see above). Nominate race and affabilis intergrade in SW California (USA). Race mohavensis sometimes merged with latter. Other proposed races include sequestratus (SW Oregon and NW California) and kernensis (drainage of Kern R and adjacent E slopes of Sierra Nevada, in California), both synonymized with nominate, and transpositus (SW California W of the deserts), merged with affabilis. Four subspecies recognized.

Subspecies and Distribution
  • B. i. inornatus (Gambel, 1845) – SW USA (SW Oregon S to SW & SC California).
  • B. i. affabilis Grinnell & Swarth, 1926 – SW California and extreme NW Mexico (N Baja California).
  • B. i. mohavensis (A. H. Miller, 1946) – SE California (Little San Bernardino Mts).
  • B. i. cineraceus (Ridgway, 1883) – W Mexico (S Baja California).
  • Descriptive notes

    15–16 cm; 12·6–19·2 g. Large, grey tit with short crest. Nominate race has crown, crest and upperparts, including upperwing-coverts, grey-brown,... read more

    Voice

    Calls include soft “sip” or “sisip”, “sit-sit” or “si-si-... read more

    Habitat

    Mostly lowland dry evergreen woodlands, mainly of oak (Quercus) but may also include pine... read more

    Food and feeding

    Food includes small invertebrates and larvae; also acorns, leaf buds, catkins, and some fruit, principally berries. Usually solitary, in... read more

    Breeding

    Season late Mar to mid-Jul; one brood. Pair-bond maintained for life. Territory defended throughout year, particularly in spring and also... read more

    Movements

    Mainly resident; some, possibly juveniles, make short-distance movements to lower levels at... read more

    Status and conservation

    Not globally threatened. Considered to be common or fairly common throughout range.

    Recommended citation

    Gosler, A. & Clement, P. (2018). Oak Titmouse (Baeolophus inornatus). In: del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. (retrieved from https://www.hbw.com/node/59881 on 16 January 2018).